thursday 31 august - god's own country + q&a with francis lee - duke's at komedia - 6.30pm

Director: Francis Lee (UK / 2017 / 105 mins) 

Johnny Saxby works long hours on his family’s remote farm in the north of England. He numbs the daily frustration of his lonely existence with nightly binge drinking at the local pub and casual sex. But when a handsome Romanian migrant worker arrives to take up temporary work on the family farm, Johnny suddenly finds himself dealing with emotions he has never felt before. As they begin working closely together during lambing season, an intense relationship forms – one that could change Johnny’s life forever. Captivating and broodingly beautiful, God’s Own Country is the award-winning debut feature from writer-director Francis Lee. Set in the heart of rural Yorkshire, this is a bracingly openhearted romantic story marked by stunning lead performances.

This project is supported by Film Hub South East with National Lottery funds distributed by the BFI Film Audience Network (FAN).

wednesday 27 september - desert hearts - fabrica gallery - 7.30 doors, 8.00 film

Eyes Wide Open Cinema is teaming up with the University of Sussex's Centre for the Study of Sexual Dissidence and Centre for American Studies, to bring you a season of pioneering American queer cinema at Fabrica Gallery. We begin with Donna Deitch's landmark 1985 drama Desert Hearts

The film will have closed captions (English subtitles especially for D/deaf or hard of hearing attendees) and the event will have British Sign Language interpretation. 

Director: Donna Deitch. 1985. USA. 96 minutes.

In 1950s Nevada, discontented professor Vivian arrives in Reno to obtain a quick divorce from her husband. On the ranch where she is staying, she meets Cay, the daughter of ranch owner, a bohemian self-assured lesbian who works in the local casino and makes art on the side. As the two women grow closer, Vivian becomes anxious about her emerging feelings towards Cay and, against the backdrop of rocky landscapes and desert planes, the two begin to come to terms with their emergent desires. 

While Desert Hearts is the most conventional narrative love story of our season, its importance should not be underestimated. Deitch’s romance helped widen the horizon of her queer cinematic successors in the decades that followed. 

+ short film BOOTWMN in association with the Women Over 50 Film Festival

Directors: Paige Gratland and Sam McWilliams. 2015. USA. 11 mins. 

Deana McGuffin is a third generation New Mexico bootmaker, hand-crafting wearable pieces of art. When she is approached by a Canadian artist and a San Franciscan tattooer to create a gay-themed cowboy boot, a story unravels of a unique collaboration that takes them to the heart of cowboy country.

Provocation: '"Lots of iced tea and no deep thinking": Romance, representation, and the lesbian sex wars' by Flora Dunster. 

Find out more about accessibility at Fabrica. As well as online, bookings can be made during gallery opening hours by speaking to a member of the gallery team or at the Fabrica office during office hours.

This project is supported by Film Hub South East with National Lottery funds distributed by the BFI Film Audience Network (FAN).

thursday 19 october - tongues untied - fabrica gallery - 7.30 doors, 8.00 film

Image reproduced courtesy of Signifyin' Works. 

Image reproduced courtesy of Signifyin' Works. 

Eyes Wide Open Cinema is teaming up with the University of Sussex's Centre for the Study of Sexual Dissidence and Centre for American Studies, to bring you a season of pioneering American queer cinema at Fabrica Gallery. 

The film will have closed captions (English subtitles especially for D/deaf or hard of hearing attendees) and the event will have British Sign Language interpretation. 

Director: Marlon Riggs. 1989. USA. 55 mins. 

"Black men loving Black men is the revolutionary act"

Marlon Riggs's landmark essay film Tongues Untied is a bold vindication of black gay men in 1980s America. This semi-documentary explores the perspectives at the intersection of black gay life as its subjects confront racism, homophobia and social marginalisation. Mixing autobiography with music, performance and poetry (by Essex Hemphill and others), Riggs forged new artistic ground in the articulation of identity, culture and self-expression. Praised by black queer audiences for its authentic representation of style, and culture, as well its fierce response to oppression, Tongues Untied remains as powerful today as ever. 

"My struggle has allowed me to transcend that sense of shame and stigma identified with my being a black gay man. Having come through that fire, they can't touch me." - Marlon T. Riggs

Find out more about accessibility at Fabrica. As well as online, bookings can be made during gallery opening hours by speaking to a member of the gallery team or at the Fabrica office during office hours.

This project is supported by Film Hub South East with National Lottery funds distributed by the BFI Film Audience Network (FAN).

thursday 16 november - the early shorts of cheryl dunye - fabrica gallery - doors 7.30, film 8.00

Eyes Wide Open Cinema is teaming up with the University of Sussex's Centre for the Study of Sexual Dissidence and Centre for American Studies, to bring you a season of pioneering American queer cinema at Fabrica Gallery. 

The films will have closed captions (English subtitles especially for D/deaf or hard of hearing attendees) and the event will have British Sign Language interpretation.  

Cheryl Dunye is one of the most distinct voices in American queer cinema history, bursting onto the scene with her wryly funny social critiques of friendship and dating in interracial lesbian communities. Most well known for her 1996 feature The Watermelon Woman, Dunye's short films are criminally unknown but should be appreciated as humorous gems that exemplify the innovations of her signature "Dunyementary" style.

She Don't Fade (1991, 24 mins)

Dyke yenta Zoe gives the complete lowdown on a story of the romantic turmoils of a young black lesbian. When serial monogamist turned single street vendor Shae meets the attractive Margot at her stall, she is instantly drawn to her and the two begin dating. But when Shae crosses paths with the mysterious Nicky, she finds herself in a romantic quandary. Torn between two lovers, and feeling like a fool.  

Vanilla Sex (1992, 4 mins)

Two friends reflect on whether vanilla sex is what you do, or who you do. 

The Potluck And The Passion (1993, 22 mins) 

A black lesbian couple decides to host a potluck dinner party to celebrate their one-year anniversary and to meet each other's friends for the first time. But when the vegans meet the meat-eaters, the white liberals meet the black scholars, the New Yorkers meet the Washingtonians, and the lesbians meet the women who date men, tensions arise and relationships are put to the test. 

Greetings From Africa (1994, 10 mins)

After breaking up with her girlfriend of four years, Cheryl makes a pact with herself to be single and play the field.  When Cheryl meets sexy redhead Elle at a lesbian cocktail party, the two bond over their cynicism towards the party's free-spirited guests. When Cheryl and Elle begin to hang out, things quickly become intense, but is there more to the mysterious Elle that shes not telling Cheryl?

Find out more about accessibility at Fabrica. As well as online, bookings can be made during gallery opening hours by speaking to a member of the gallery team or at the Fabrica office during office hours.

This project is supported by Film Hub South East with National Lottery funds distributed by the BFI Film Audience Network (FAN).

thursday 7 december - hustler white - fabrica gallery - doors 7.30, film 8.00

Eyes Wide Open Cinema is teaming up with the University of Sussex's Centre for the Study of Sexual Dissidence and Centre for American Studies, to bring you a season of pioneering American queer cinema at Fabrica Gallery. We close with the 1996 Hustler White. 

The film will have closed captions (English subtitles especially for D/deaf or hard of hearing attendees) and the event will have British Sign Language interpretation.

Directors: Bruce LaBruce and Rick Castro. 1996. USA. 79 minutes. 

“John Waters once said "Gay is not enough," and I feel the same way about transgression—it's not enough. It's how you express the idea of transgression, or the concept of it. So what I've done is, I've taken things that are taboo and shocking, and I've tried to make them more human, more romantic, against expectations.” - Bruce LaBruce 

Educated in cinema under the tutelage of film theorist Robin Wood, Canadian DIY filmmaker LaBruce started his career in the late 1980s, where he became known (and sometimes infamous) for formally experimental films that addressed shocking or taboo subjects, even on the margins of queer culture itself. LaBruce was inspired to work with photographer Rick Castro, after viewing a short film featuring interviews with hustlers. 

Hustler White follows lovelorn anthropologist Jürgen (Bruce LaBruce) as he heads to Los Angeles to research hustlers as a phenomenon. After Jürgen spots angel-faced trick Montgomery (bisexual supermodel Tony Ward), he falls hopelessly in love. The film introduces a bizarre array of LA’s most eccentric residents, including a born-again country singer, a razor blade masochist, a mortician-cum-dominatrix and an amputee fetishist, and with cameos by Ron Athey and Vaginal Davis. Inspired by Billy Wilder’s classic Sunset Boulevard but subverted with quintessential LaBrucian style, Hustler White is a roller coaster ride of sex, money, depravity and a little bit of romance.

“It’s disgusting, sick, filthy, pornographic and scary. But as far as disgusting, sick, filthy, scary porno films go, it’s not bad" - Sunday Mail


Provocation: "What the Fuck is QUEERCORE? Or, Bruce LaBruce: Putting the ‘Gay’ Back in ‘Punk’ and the ‘Punk’ back in ‘Gay’ Since 1985" by Diarmuid Hester

Find out more about accessibility at Fabrica. As well as online, bookings can be made during gallery opening hours by speaking to a member of the gallery team or at the Fabrica office during office hours.

This project is supported by Film Hub South East with National Lottery funds distributed by the BFI Film Audience Network (FAN).